(See links in red & contacts in bold)

For Emergencies: CALL 911

Enter the Calming Room Here!

For Ongoing Support

If you or someone you know needs help, take one of the following actions:

  • School counselors continue to be available to support students and families during these unique and often stressful times. You can connect with each grade level counselor on a range of topics including academics, personal-emotional concerns, social conflicts, college and career information, and referrals to community resources. While school counselors do not provide ongoing therapy, they are available for solution-focused-brief-counseling, collaborative problem solving and positive support through challenging emotions and situations. School counselor contact information is available on each school website, see a list of school counselors here.
  • Oregon Youthline (a free, confidential teen-to-teen crisis and help line; teens are available 4 to 10 p.m. daily; adults available all other times) 1-877-968-8491 or text teen2teen to 839863
  • Lane County Crisis Line 541-687-4000 
  • Contact school counseling center or other mental health professional
  • Lane County Sheriff’s Non-Emergency Number: (541) 682-4150
  • Call Lane County Behavioral Health (541) 682-3608; Child and Adolescent Program: 541-682-1915
  • University of Oregon? 
  • Prevention Lane is a website from Lane County is an everyday mental health awareness campaign from Lane County Health Services
  • SafeOregon: Tip line to report and respond to student safety threats. Call or Text 844-472-3367
  • The Trevor Project Lifeline: 1-866-488-7386 (for LGBTQ+ youth)
  • YouthEra: Virtual drop ins from 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM on https://discord.com/invite/4n4h2K4 Discord Streaming live (moderated chat) with two state-certified youth peer support specialists, on Twitch Monday-Friday from 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM and 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM. 
  • Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741 from anywhere in the USA, anytime, about any type of crisis. 
  • HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools) 541-246-2342 crisis counseling  weekdays 9 AM – 4 PM a community partner that provides mobile crisis response support to 4J and other high schools, will offer mental health support by phone for high school students, families and staff while schools are closed. Staff are able to provide short-term counseling, resource referrals, and Oregon Health Plan signup. Staff, guardians, concerned individuals and students can fill out this FORM and HOOTS will make contact.  You can also call HOOTS at 541-246-2342 or for video chat options email hoots@whitebirdclinic.org 
  • CAHOOTS (Crisis Assistance Helping Out On the Streets): non-emergency mobile crisis intervention. 541-682-5111 (Eugene); 541-726-3714 (Springfield)
  • Hourglass Community Crisis Center: 541-505-8426(Short-term mental health crisis assessment & stabilization for adults, 24 hours/day)
  • White Bird: 541-687-4000; 1-800-422-7558 (24 hour local crisis line
  • Looking Glass Youth & Family Crisis Line: 541-689-3111 Station 7 continues to provide largely the same services we provided previous to Covid-19, we are just screening clients upon entry by taking temperature and assessing for Covid-19 symptoms and then we are practicing CDC and HUD recommended guidelines within shelter as far as social distancing and sanitizing goes. We are able to take youth 11-21 at Station 7 but youth 18+ have to be in their own room (or in a room with only other 18+) and we have to prioritize 11-17 so we take those 18+ stays on a night by night basis depending on our room availability. We also continue to operate the 24/7 crisis phone and texting line for the agency.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 
  • Mental Health Crisis Response Program: 1-888-989-9990 (for parents of children through age 17)
  • 15th Night will also be continuing to offer support and resources for unhoused youth and those working with them via phone and text at 541-246-4046. Many other social services in the area are also working on providing phone or virtual services. You may also contact our Sheldon Community Responder Trista Neuman. A Sheldon Community Responder is a volunteer that responds to “alerts” sent by the 15th Night Coordinator at Sheldon High School for needs specific to Sheldon High School students that have not been met by internal school resources. These type of alerts would be for items such as clothing, shoes, small household items, food or bedding. A Sheldon High School Community Responder would receive a text message indicating a need. If the Responder can provide the need, they respond to the text message and work with the Sheldon High School Coordinator to secure and deliver the item. Please contact Trista Neuman at neuman_t@4j.lane.edu.

Additional Resources

Safe and Strong Helpline – 1-800-923-HELP

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line. Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available. If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give the helpline a call. The call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed. If you are experiencing a mental health crisis, please call the Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Racial Equity Support Line 503-575-3764

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. It offers support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and micro-aggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues. Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness. The person who answers may be a stranger – but the operators understand what you’re going through. They will listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you. Call 503-575-3764 weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Reach Out Oregon

This is a resource for parents to receive support and help from other parents. Families with children experiencing mental, emotional or behavioral health challenges will gain access to a support team of families and friends and a community network where questions are answered, resources are shared, and needs are understood. Resources include a warm line for families to call or leave a message, 1.833.REACH.OR (1.833.732.2467); an online forum, live chat or email: info@reachoutoregon.org. Learn more: https://www.reachoutoregon.org/

Lane County Parenting Resources 

YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION: TIPS, WARNING SIGNS AND HOW TO HELP

How to Talk to Students About Suicide (from Oregon Health Authority)

Warning Signs:

  • Talking about hurting themselves
  • Making plans for suicide
  • Expressing severe distress, hopelessness and/or withdrawing from others
  • Displaying worrisome behavior

How to Help:

  • Ask if they are having thoughts of suicide
  • Listen thoughtfully, without judgment
  • Let them know that you care and they have been heard
  • Help them find assistance through a trusted adult and/or by calling one of the resources, such as Oregon Youthline 877-968-8491; Lane County Crisis Line 541-687-4000; or National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 800-273-TALK

Getting Through Today

 Don’t let feelings of stress, overwhelm, or depression loom over you until they become too much. Instead, here are some tips to help make sure you’re taking care of your body, mind, and social life: 

My Body: I’m feeling: tired, no energy, crummy, hungry, lazy.

When you’re not taking care of your body, nothing else feels right, so this is a great place to start when you feel like there’s too much going on to handle. Here’s what I will do to take care of my body when I feel like my back is against a wall: 

  • East a tasty snack
  • Drink a big glass of water
  • Exercise (walk, run, bike ride, stretch, do push-ups, play Wii)
  • Get up, take a shower/bubble bath, and get dressed
  • Turn on some music and dance
  • Take 10 deep breaths
  • Go to bed early or take a nap

My Mind: I’m feeling: panic, sadness, hopelessness, negativity, frustration, anger.

When you’re really stressed, it’s important to relax your mind, and it’s really hard to do in the heat of the moment. Here’s what I will do to take care of my mind when my life feels out of control: 

  • Listen to music or work on a song I’m writing
  • Watch a movie
  • Do something artistic like draw, paint, dance or sing
  • Look in the mirror and tell myself, “I’m a rockstar”
  • Write in a journal
  • Read a book
  • Lose the caffeine
  • Take a personal time out

 

My Social Life: I’m feeling: isolated, lonely, disconnected, left out, being a loner, anti-social.

We all feel better when we’re around other people. That’s why the last step in your plan should be to connect with others or reach out for more help. There’s no reason to try and deal with it alone. Here’s what I will do to take care of myself socially when I’m feeling alone:

  • Call a friend or trusted family member
  • Start a blog or vlog
  • Find out what clubs my school has that I’d like to join
  • Play with my pet or take my neighbor’s dog for a walk
  • Fill idle time by volunteering for something I care about
  • Connect with friends on social media
  • When in doubt, get out and people watch! (Go to the mall, bookstore, community center, etc.)

Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships

Please refer to the links below for more information and keep in mind your counselor is available for support.

Self Care

Mindfulness Resources:

Five Free Mindfulness Apps

Square Breathing Technique

Mindfulness for Teens

Articles:

How to Motivate Yourself When It’s Hard

Meditation Can Change Your Brain

The Benefit of Routines

Self-Care Videos:

A Guide to Self Care

How to Practice Self-Care During COVID Pandemic

5 Tips to Protect Mental Health During Coronavirus Pandemic

Teens and Sleep

Until recently, teens often got a bad rap for staying up late, oversleeping for school, and falling asleep in class. But recent studies show that adolescent sleep patterns actually differ from those of adults or kids.

Experts say that during the teen years, the body’s circadian rhythm (sort of like an internal biological clock) is temporarily reset, telling a person to fall asleep later and wake up later. This change might be due to the fact that the brain hormone melatonin is produced later at night for teens than it is for kids and adults. This can make it harder for teens to fall asleep early.

These changes in the body’s circadian rhythm coincide with a busy time in life. For most teens, the pressure to do well in school is more intense than when they were kids, and it’s harder to get by without studying hard. And teens also have other time demands — everything from sports and other extracurricular activities to working a part-time job to save money for college.

Early start times in some schools also might play a role in lost sleep. Teens who fall asleep after midnight may still have to get up early for school, meaning that they might squeeze in only 6 or 7 hours of sleep a night. A few hours of missed sleep a night may not seem like a big deal, but it can create a noticeable sleep deficit over time.

Why is sleep important?

A sleep deficit affects everything from someone’s ability to pay attention in class to his or her mood. According to a National Sleep Foundation Sleep in America poll, more than 25% of high school students fall asleep in class, and experts have tied lost sleep to poorer grades. Lack of sleep also damages teens’ ability to do their best in athletics.

Slowed responses and dulled concentration from lack of sleep don’t just affect school or sports performance, though. More than half of teens surveyed reported that they have driven a car while drowsy over the past year and 15% said they drove drowsy at least once a week. The National Highway Safety Traffic Administration estimates that more than 100,000 accidents, 40,000 injuries, and 1,500 people are killed in the U.S. every year in crashes caused by drivers who are simply tired. Young people under the age of 25 are far more likely to be involved in drowsy driving crashes.

Lack of sleep also is linked to emotional troubles, such as feelings of sadness and depression. Sleep helps keep us physically healthy, too, by slowing the body’s systems to re-energize us for everyday activities.

Am I getting enough sleep?

Even if you think you’re getting enough sleep, you might not be. Here are some of the signs that you may need more sleep:

  • difficulty waking up in the morning
  • inability to concentrate
  • falling asleep during classes
  • feelings of moodiness and even depression

How can I get more sleep?

Some researchers, parents, and teachers have suggested that middle- and high-school classes begin later in the morning to accommodate teens’ need for more sleep. Some schools have implemented later start times. You and your friends, parents, and teachers can lobby for later start times at your school, but in the meantime you’ll have to make your own adjustments.

Here are some things that may help you to sleep better:

  • Set a regular bedtime. Going to bed at the same time each night signals to your body that it’s time to sleep. Waking up at the same time every day also can help establish sleep patterns. So try to stick as closely as you can to your sleep schedule, even on weekends. Try not to go to sleep more than an hour later or wake up more than 2 to 3 hours later than you do during the week.
  • Exercise regularly. Try not to exercise right before bed, though, as it can rev you up and make it harder to fall asleep. Finish exercising at least 3 hours before bedtime. Many sleep experts believe that exercising in late afternoon may actually help a person sleep.
  • Avoid stimulants. Don’t drink beverages with caffeine, such as soda and coffee, after 4 p.m. Nicotine is also a stimulant, so quitting smoking may help you sleep better. And drinking alcohol in the evening can make a person restless and interrupt sleep.
  • Relax your mind. Avoid violent, scary, or action movies or television shows right before bed — anything that might set your mind and heart racing. Reading books with involved or active plots may also keep you from falling or staying asleep.
  • Unwind by keeping the lights low. Light signals the brain that it’s time to wake up.
  • Staying away from bright lights (including computer screens!), as well as meditating or listening to soothing music, can help your body relax. Try to avoid TV, computers and other electronics, and using your phone (including texting) at least 1 hour before you go to bed.
  • Don’t nap too much. Naps of more than 30 minutes during the day and naps too close to bedtime may keep you from falling asleep later.
  • Avoid all-nighters. Don’t wait until the night before a big test to study. Cutting back on sleep the night before a test may mean you perform worse than you would if you’d studied less but got more sleep.
  • Create the right sleeping environment. Studies show that people sleep best in a dark
  • room that is slightly on the cool side. Close your blinds or curtains (and make sure they’re heavy enough to block out light) and turn down the thermostat (pile on extra blankets or wear PJs if you’re cold). Lots of noise can be a sleep turnoff, too. Use a nature sounds or white-noise machine (or app!) if you need to block out a noisy environment.
  • Wake up with bright light. Bright light in the morning signals your body that it’s time to get going. If it’s dark in your room, it can help to turn on a light as soon as your alarm goes off.
  • If you’re drowsy, it’s hard to look and feel your best. Schedule “sleep” as an item on your agenda to help you stay creative and healthy.

Why teens don’t get enough sleep?

Until recently, teens often got a bad rap for staying up late, oversleeping for school, and falling asleep in class. But recent studies show that adolescent sleep patterns actually differ from those of adults or kids.

Experts say that during the teen years, the body’s circadian rhythm (sort of like an internal biological clock) is temporarily reset, telling a person to fall asleep later and wake up later. This change might be due to the fact that the brain hormone melatonin is produced later at night for teens than it is for kids and adults. This can make it harder for teens to fall asleep early.

These changes in the body’s circadian rhythm coincide with a busy time in life. For most teens, the pressure to do well in school is more intense than when they were kids, and it’s harder to get by without studying hard. And teens also have other time demands — everything from sports and other extracurricular activities to working a part-time job to save money for college.

Early start times in some schools also might play a role in lost sleep. Teens who fall asleep after midnight may still have to get up early for school, meaning that they might squeeze in only 6 or 7 hours of sleep a night. A few hours of missed sleep a night may not seem like a big deal, but it can create a noticeable sleep deficit over time.

Sources: American Academy of Pediatrics at Healthychildren.org, KidsHealth.org from Nemours, Unionville High School, PA 2021

Parent Resources

Talking To Adolescents And Teens: Starting The Conversation

Mental Health First Aid: 5 Tips for Talking to your Teenager about Mental Health

7 Things Parents Need to Know about Mental Health 

Born This Way Foundation

Sources of Strength Daily Activities Checklist

Child Abuse Prevention

Experts estimate that 1 in 10 children are sexually abused before their 18th birthday (reflects physical contact acts of sexual abuse only) – Townsend, C., Rheingold, A.A., (2003) Learn More About This Study

What is Child Sexual Abuse?

Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) includes any sexual contact between an adult (18 or older) and a minor (younger than 18) or between two minors, when one exerts power over the other. Sexual contact between minors is abuse when physical or psychological coercion is used, or when there is a significant difference in the physical size or developmental levels of the minors, or when there is an age difference of 3 or more years.Child Sexual abuse also includes non-contact acts such as exhibitionism, exposure to pornography, voyeurism, child pornography, commercial sexual exploitation of children and communicating in a sexual manor by phone or internet.

How do I report a suspicion of child abuse?

With any disclosures or suspicion of abuse, you must make a report.

Call local law enforcement’s non-emergency number or dial 911 if there is immediate danger. Or call the Department of Human Services-Child Welfare at 541-693-2854.

If you need additional resources or support call KIDS Center at 541-383-5958.

You do not have to know all the details or know for certain abuse is happening to report a concern/suspicion.Follow your instincts and report what you have seen/heard or behaviors that are concerning. When calling to make a report it is important to know that you are not making an accusation, but you are simply making what is called a “good faith” report requesting a professional service to be conducted.

For more information about Oregon reporting laws